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how does boo radley show vulnerability novel kill

how does boo radley show vulnerability novel kill
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Because of his reclusive life and the mystery surrounding it, Boo Radley is very vulnerable, very open to attack. For instance, at the beginning of Scout’s narrative, in Chapter 3 as the children bring Walter home for lunch, Jem proudly boasts, “A haint lives there” as he points out the Radley house across from theirs.  Walter tells the Finch children that he nearly died from eating Radley pecans,”…folks say he pizened ’em and put  ’em over on the school side of the fence.”Other superstitious beliefs exist about Boo as Scout narrates in Chapter 1. Supposedly, Boo is a “malevolent phantom” who goes out at night when the moon is down and peeps into windows, such as that owned by Miss Stephanie Crawford.  “When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was because he had breathed on them”; if a Negro came near the Radley house at night, he would cut across the street and whistle to calm himself as he walked.  If anything out of the ordinary happened, it was thought to have been caused by Boo Radley.Also in Chapter 1 Scout relates the many rumors that abound about Boo Radley, who has not come out of his house since he was arrested by the town beadle, Mr. Conner. According to Miss Stephanie, when the judge sentenced Arthur Radley to the boys state industrial school, his father promised the judge that he would  make sure Arthur gave the town no more trouble.  Boo Radley was never seen for fifteen years.  Some said he once stabbed his father in the leg with a scissors as he passed by, and then merely resumed his activities.Certainly, Boo Radley’s vulnerability lies in the townspeople’s not knowing Arthur Radley. This ignorance of the man leads to the superstitious beliefs that they possess. Therefore, when Boo finally comes out of his house, it is surreptitiously that he does so. In Chapter 6, one night when Dill and Jem go up to a Radley window on a dare, Mr. Radley hears them and comes out with his shotgun, which he fires.  When Jem catches his pants on the barbed fence, he must take off his pants in order to escape.  But, the next day when he returns, Jem finds them mended. Later, in Chapter 8, Boo fills a knothole with gifts for Jem and Scout, adding to the children’s superstitious wonder about him.Perhaps at no other time, though, is Arthur Radley more vulnerable than at the end of the narrative when this maladjusted, timid recluse bravely defends the chidren through whom he has lived vicariously.  His courageous defense of Jem and Scout ends with the death of Bob Ewell, a death that Sheriff Tate concludes that is caused by Ewell’s having fallen upon his own knife.  When Atticus is not convinced, he tells the lawyer,”I never heard tell that it’s against the law for a citizen to do his utmost to prevent a crime from being committed…but maybe you’ll say it’s my duty to tell the town all about it and not hush it up.  Know what’d happen then?  All the ladies in  Maycomb…would be knocking on his door bringing angel food cakes.  To my way of think’, Mr. Finch taking the one man who’s done you and this town a great service an’ draggin’ him with his shy ways into the limelight–to me, that a sin.  It’s a sin and I’m not about to have it on my head.  If it was any other man it’d be different.  But not this man, Mr. Finch.”Clearly, Mr. Tate recognizes the vulnerability of Boo Radley who would be susceptible to the curious and those who would exploit his new found notoriety.
how does boo radley show vulnerability novel kill

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what morals story ministers black veil

what morals story ministers black veil
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In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s story “The Minister’s Black Veil”, The Reverend Mr. Hooper decides to don a black crepe veil that only allows the parishioners to see his mouth move.This is a pretty strange and creepy move from an otherwise straight and dignified man. Especially one who is young, well-respected in his church community and who is even engaged to be married. What would the flock think? Why does he make this choice? What would his fiancee say?During the first sermon with the veil on, Mr. Hooper talks about secret sins, that is, about everybody’s capacity to lead a life of sin. This life of sin is kept by all of us under a veil of silence, hypocrisy, and obedience. Underneath this veil, there are all seven sins awaiting to pounce over each of us under the secrecy of the masks that we all wear.This is the basic moral that we get from the decision of wearing the black veil, as well as from the story, itself. Hawthorne creates a character that stubbornly chooses to distance himself from society in order to demonstrate the way in which our masks distance us from each other. What lurks within our souls is, basically, despicable. Hiding it, however, while showing a face of purity, is a direct insult to God and others. The basic idea that Hooper tries to instill is: admit that you all wear masks and admit that they hide your sins.”Why do you tremble at me alone?’ [..] ‘Tremble also at each other! [..]What, but the mystery which it obscurely typifies, has made this piece of crepe so awful? When the friend shows his inmost heart to his friend; the lover to his best-beloved; when a man does not vainly shrink from the eye of his Creator, loathsomely treasuring up the secret of his sin; then deem me a monster, for the symbol beneath which I have lived, and die! I look around me, and, lo! on every visage a Black Veil!Granted, this story never really appeases the reader. It is as if there is not enough substance in Hooper’s argument. More questions are asked, than answers are given. However we can conclude that the themes that can be understood are:The reality of human sin versus our inability to admit it.Loneliness and isolation as a result of sin.The capability of hypocrisy, even from so called “church-going people”.The horrid reality of moral sin and how it “darkens” our existence the way that the veil, which represents sin, darkens Mr. Hooper’s view of life.
what morals story ministers black veil

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f x x x find f find f

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tribe with largest percentage black indians

tribe with largest percentage black indians
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It is hard to know this for sure because the genealogies of present-day individuals is not known for sure in all cases.  Therefore, there cannot be any exact count of the number of “black Indians.”The tribe that is most likely to have the most “black Indians” is the Seminole tribe.  This tribe originally lived in Florida and harbored many African Americans.  Black slaves would escape into Florida and take refuge, in some cases, with the Seminole.It is possible that your textbook or your instructor might say that the Cherokee are the tribe with the most “black Indians.”  The Cherokee had African American slaves and also had other contact with African Americans.  Therefore, there came to be a relatively large number of Cherokee with African American blood.
tribe with largest percentage black indians

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how did entry us change war both militarily

how did entry us change war both militarily
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You did not specify which war you were asking about, so I have guessed that you are asking about WWI.  I have changed your question to reflect this and I hope I made the right choice.The main impact that the entry of the US had on the war was military. Before the US entered the war, the military situation had been one of stalemate.  Neither side was able to gain an upper hand.  When a large new force enters such a conflict, it of course has a huge impact.  The US entry allowed the Allied Powers to win the war in rather short order as the stalemate was broken.The US entry also had an impact on the politics of the war and, more importantly, of the peace process after the war.  President Wilson was determined to push for his “14 Points” agenda.  This put many more ideas (such as self-determination, freedom of the seas, and other such idealistic things) on the agenda at the peace conference.
how did entry us change war both militarily

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ideas discussing emerging trends major

ideas discussing emerging trends major
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I dont need any help now. I submitted paper days ago.
ideas discussing emerging trends major

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find second degree polynomial p x such that p

find second degree polynomial p x such that p
your websiago. I started with them because I was really new and I didn’t knew thete IP behind it and protect it from attacks and spammers. When a
A second degree polynomial p(x) has to be determined such that p(2) = 1, p'(2) = -2, and p”(2) = 3Let p(x) = ax^2 + bx + cp(2) = a*4 + b*2 + c = 1p'(2) = 2a*2 + b = -2p”(2) = 2a = 3=> a = 3/26 + b = -2=> b = -86 – 16 + c = 1=> c = 11The polynomial p(x) = (3/2)*x^2 – 8x + 11
find second degree polynomial p x such that p

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high percentage countrys labor force engaged

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there presently federally recognized tribes bands

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why does austen call elizabeth by her first name

why does austen call elizabeth by her first name
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During the Regency Period, it was common for women family members to call each other by their christian names (first names). But men, even informally, were more often called by their sir names. Hence, we frequently see even Mr. Bingley refer to his best friend Mr. Darcy as “Darcy.” We see an example of this at the Meryton ball. Mr. Bingley says, “Come, Darcy…I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner” (Vol. 1, Ch. 3).Women who grew up together from childhood, such as sisters or school mates, commonly called each other by their first names (“Correct Forms of Address”). Therefore, in referring to Elizabeth by her first name, and sometimes even to Jane by her first name, rather than by Miss Bennet, Austen is putting the narrator on the same level of familiarity as the rest of her female characters, especially the Bennet sisters. Austen is making the narrator act like an extra sister to the girls or at least as an extra close friend. The effect is that even though Austen uses a third person omniscient narrator that focuses on Elizabeth, because Elizabeth is always addressed informally by the narrator, the reader feels more intimately acquainted with Elizabeth and the other characters. Also, in not addressing any of the men informally, but rather always as Mr. Bingley or Mr. Darcey, Austen is conforming to the accepted social norms for women. Women only addressed men formally, and as a woman, it makes perfect sense that Austen would have her narrator act as a woman and address the men formally but treat the women as close friends or sisters.
why does austen call elizabeth by her first name